Dieselpunks

Dieselpunk + Steampunk Culture

I know it's a toxic subject but I've posted to my blog on the possibility of developing a set of criteria where certain political theories might be labeled as "dieselpunk." I would love feedback on what I've written.
http://dieselpunk44.blogspot.com/
~ Larry


Views: 300

Reply to This

Replies to This Discussion

Interesting.... I don't like that you mentioned Ayn Rand, but otherwise very interesting.

That would be my fault...

In any case, i've also suggested Larry Anarcho-Technocracy (a more communist/collectivist version of dieselpunk politics), but now that I think of it it would be interesting finding a non-anarchist interpretation of dieselpunk politics as well.
I'm a little less radical in my opinions either way and I can't see either extreme being able to stand. Too many Unintended Consequenses that I'll extrapolate on when time permits. I'll also share my first-hand accounts of why our current two-party oligarchy is failing so miserably.

I'm really still trying to find my political footing after my faith in existent political theories and applications fell apart. Rather than rehashing old Diesel-Era political theories that have self-deconstructed over the decades I'd seek to find what works and piece it together into something functional. Reconfiguration (there's that damned word again) is necessary here, and frankly picking through the political scrap yard is daunting enough to be infuriating.
Well I've been working on something that incorporates a few different kinda Dieselpunk ideas, namely the so-called nanny state, taking care of your needs, with an almost anarchic libertarian kind of idea.

It's hard to describe, but I'm trying to get a blog up so that I can scrbble some stuff down.

And amen to the two-party oligarchy collapsing. In Canada, there's the same thing, with a bunch of other little parties who will never win just running around distracting people.
Hayen Mill said:
Interesting.... I don't like that you mentioned Ayn Rand, but otherwise very interesting.

That would be my fault...

Actually, there's been discussion of Ayn Rand in the genre from the start. Piecraft mentioned Atlas Shrugged early on and there's been different Objectivist influences ever since.
And, of course, there's BioShock.
For those interested I have a political/ economic blog as well, which describes my views. I don't want to push it and possibly take this thread off-topic.

In trying to keep on topic I think my views fit Hayen's interest in a non-anarchist interpretation of dieselpunk. Especially look at my posting back on June 13 about Kagawa. Here's a link to that particular entry.
http://buildingthirdway.blogspot.com/2010/06/toyohiko-kagawa.html
Oh, I so want the time to write more here!

Very quickly:

I think Rand needs to be discussed in any political modeling for the same reason Marx, Keynes, and any other popular economic philosopher needs to be. While my dad was a hard-core Objectivist, I've had my doubts. Still, though, so much of her work has influenced economic thought it's a must-discuss.

Larry: I need to get to reading that blog more. I'm curious to see what sets "Economic Democracy" as different than Syndicalism or Mutualism.
What does Ayn Rand bring to a potluck?



....a sandwich.

Cap'n Tony said:
Oh, I so want the time to write more here!

Very quickly:

I think Rand needs to be discussed in any political modeling for the same reason Marx, Keynes, and any other popular economic philosopher needs to be. While my dad was a hard-core Objectivist, I've had my doubts. Still, though, so much of her work has influenced economic thought it's a must-discuss.

Larry: I need to get to reading that blog more. I'm curious to see what sets "Economic Democracy" as different than Syndicalism or Mutualism.
Damien Hewitt: "what does Ayn Rand bring to a potluck?

...a sandwich
"

I don't get it :S
A sandwich (to eat for herself). The idea is that Rand's ideology prohibits any activity which is directed toward the good of other people (altruism); therefore the whole concept of a potluck, in which you're supposed to bring food to share with others, and take the risk, of enjoying, or not, whatever food others bring, should be anathema to Rand.

Under a purely selfish philosophy, every participant in the potluck would attempt to game the system by bringing either nothing at all, or, if that weren't possible, the worst, cheapest, or least labor-intensive dish that he could think of, gambling that other people would bring better food and he would be able to dine well off the efforts of others while putting minimal effort in himself. If everybody thought that way, the result would be a tableful of inedible dishes, and everyone would go home hungry. That isn't, however, how it usually works.

Hayen Mill said:
Damien Hewitt: "what does Ayn Rand bring to a potluck?

...a sandwich
"

I don't get it :S
Anarchism in practice would, I think, be either very terrifying or very boring. The terrifying option is what most people think of when they think of 'anarchy' -- no police, riots, looting, rape and murder, and eventually government-by-gang.

The boring option is how it's supposed to work: and it implies that everyone is going to be able and willing to be as involved with politics as (at least) the average alderman, and that you will spend half your day going to various councils and boards trying to hash out a 100% consensus on the exact layout of the sewer lines and all the other things most of us don't bother our heads about because of SEDIFY (Somebody Else Does It For You).
From what I gather from reading her books she'd bring herself a gourmet meal and neither share it nor accept anything offered from anyone else, and expect everyone else to do the same. She seemed to me as much against accepting charity as giving.

Caerulctor said:
A sandwich (to eat for herself). The idea is that Rand's ideology prohibits any activity which is directed toward the good of other people (altruism); therefore the whole concept of a potluck, in which you're supposed to bring food to share with others, and take the risk, of enjoying, or not, whatever food others bring, should be anathema to Rand.

Under a purely selfish philosophy, every participant in the potluck would attempt to game the system by bringing either nothing at all, or, if that weren't possible, the worst, cheapest, or least labor-intensive dish that he could think of, gambling that other people would bring better food and he would be able to dine well off the efforts of others while putting minimal effort in himself. If everybody thought that way, the result would be a tableful of inedible dishes, and everyone would go home hungry. That isn't, however, how it usually works.

Hayen Mill said:
Damien Hewitt: "what does Ayn Rand bring to a potluck?

...a sandwich
"

I don't get it :S

Reply to Discussion

RSS

Stay in touch

FacebookTwitterRSS

Allied Powers

Diesel powered dieselpunk podcast
Dieselpunk Industries
Seance Media by Tome Wilson
Vnv Nation

© 2019   Created by Tome Wilson.   Powered by

Badges  |  Report an Issue  |  Terms of Service