Dieselpunks

Dieselpunk + Steampunk Culture

In today's modern world we're forced to see the perspective of popular opinion. We're fed convenient tips and mass opinions to such a point that even if we do not agree with or follow them, we still feel self conscious over these opinions. Which is funny because every technological, scientific, spiritual, even breakthrough from self awareness we have ever encountered and now embrace took time to discover and introduce to the world. Take into mind the extreme changes over the past hundred or so years alone as example to these statements. And yet somehow there still seems to be forms of alienation against so many new revolutionary ideas that in their own way benefit humanity.

I see Dieselpunk, and Steampunk as entirely beneficial to society as a whole. For one they boost economy ( Think about the modder's, and the products that can be produced, recycling old and vintage clothes while gaining revenue, the new genre of film and video games, and specialty stores.), then there's the benefit to the environment ( just think about how many cool gizmo's and gadget's you've seen that were recycled from miscellaneous stuff that were just laying around.), finally (And one I see as VERY important!) would you rather find out your kid is spending his weekly allowance on pot, or a new pocket watch and some matching cuffs?

As well as a benefit to society, it's also a benefit to the overall mentality of society. Since man has walked this earth we have always found a creative outlet to express ourselves. From cavemen telling amazing stories through cave paintings, to the barbaric sports of the roman empire, to philosophy. Mankind has always discovered new and exciting ways to discover self awareness and express themselves and as a result escape the compressing obligations of reality for just a moment. With this in mind we can look at the mental evolution of society.

We are now more creative and expressive than ever. Practically everything we do has a creative spin on it. Think about this the next time you go shopping, and see the colorful and crafty designer labels on all the products you buy. We have became so expressive that even very basic designs are an expression of the beauty of simplicity. So is it really that far fetched to consider Diesel Punk, and things alike as a social norm?

I admit this post may seem a little pointless to some reader's, but those readers are the lucky few that have already reprogrammed themselves. I am writing this post for those who may seem shy or embarrassed to simply be who they are, which in this case there are plenty of.

It's simple. Don't be shy because people around you may see it as strange, because the things we all do on a day-to-day basis are completely strange, we've just adapted to them. So when you think about it, anyone who looks at you as strange or abnormal because of what you do or wear is completely hypocritical because everything they do and wear and live by is just as abnormal as everyone else's outlets.

This is why I decided to label this entry as "Escape". Because sometimes we just need to escape from the mass logic we were born into and programmed with.

Tags: dieselpunk, economics, lifestyle, society

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Well stated, Rusty!  You make some good point, particularly the "quit worrying what the perception of 'normal' is."  Interestingly that definition is indeed far wider than it was back in the Diesel Era thanks in part to Punk and its ilk.  A person with pink hair and a nose ring hardly catches anyone's attention anymore.  Back in the late 70s it was pure shock value! 

If you're not a part of the Philosophy Group here at DP.org I charge you to remedy that immediately and add to the conversation there.

Exactly! And thanks for the invitation of course. I remember being shy about my  eccentricities, then one snowy winter day I went to Walmart (Or as I prefer to call it. "Cheap's-R-Us.), and saw a patron standing outside shivering from the bite of Jack Frost, so he could smoke a cigarette. I thought to myself "Hey, this fellow is standing out in the frigid cold just so he can inhale  burning leaf and fiberglass wrapped in paper, in hindsight maybe my cap with embedded goggles really aren't that horribly unusual!". And that notion pretty much took my brain to a new perspective on what is truly unusual on this planet of procreating primates! ^.^

I admit feeling very subconcious the first time I wore a Fedora to work.  Now I'm seeing them everywhere and feel a little less unique!  No worries, though, 'cause it's a look that's totally me...and for the record I still make 'em look GOOD.

I get a lot of comments when wearing my tweed suits and trilby hats (and currently sported handlebar moustache) - I'm often amused by the assumptions people make of someone dressed this way, but that appeals to my anarcho - dandyist tendencies.

"Anarcho-dandyist" -- I love it!!

An excellent post, Rusty. Well said.

I heartily second the motion!  Escape from the pre-programmed "normalcy" now, my friends (if you haven't already).

I got called "secret agent man" by a passerby yesterday.  A few years ago I would have bristled, but now I consider it my job to wear my long wool coat (nothing eccentric, really) and my fedora as a statement that says you do not have to wear a down-filled short jacket in a neon color to be appropriately attired for winter.  If I must be a secret agent to this guy, so be it.  The laughable part of it is that I AM a secret agent; an agent of change in an increasingly follow-the-herd society.  And so are you.

The other thing that kills me is the sheer number of guys sporting long hair and tie-dyed t-shirts in my town.  It may not be World War II era anymore, but it sure ain't Woodstock either!  I often wonder why '60s retro doesn't get hassled as much as '40s retro.

Good question. A few ideas. Maybe because, for so many that was their youth since that was the style for baby boomers. Another idea is that 60s retro is still considered cool and is now in many ways fashionable.

But those are just my ideas.

Docneg said:

The other thing that kills me is the sheer number of guys sporting long hair and tie-dyed t-shirts in my town.  It may not be World War II era anymore, but it sure ain't Woodstock either!  I often wonder why '60s retro doesn't get hassled as much as '40s retro.

My weirdest interaction wat when I got mistaken for a display at the National Archives.  I'd been quietly watching a movie display in my black fedora and long wool coat (it was January).  Some poor tourist jumped three feet straight up when the movie ended and I walked away.

Most people really do like the look, though, at least here in the DC area.  Plenty of retro-hippies too, but not like you'd see in Boulder or Berkley or Madison.

Docneg said:

I heartily second the motion!  Escape from the pre-programmed "normalcy" now, my friends (if you haven't already).

I got called "secret agent man" by a passerby yesterday.  A few years ago I would have bristled, but now I consider it my job to wear my long wool coat (nothing eccentric, really) and my fedora as a statement that says you do not have to wear a down-filled short jacket in a neon color to be appropriately attired for winter.  If I must be a secret agent to this guy, so be it.  The laughable part of it is that I AM a secret agent; an agent of change in an increasingly follow-the-herd society.  And so are you.

The other thing that kills me is the sheer number of guys sporting long hair and tie-dyed t-shirts in my town.  It may not be World War II era anymore, but it sure ain't Woodstock either!  I often wonder why '60s retro doesn't get hassled as much as '40s retro.

I find it funny when people look at my outfits. Often I have had people try to get a rise out of me  by cracking comments. One person even told me I look like an inventive homeless man. Which of course made me giggle because he hadn't discovered the function of a belt yet, and displayed this by revealing his xbox undershorts proudly in his sagging yet skinny jeans. What is it exactly that makes the style seem most unusual? I wear my ankle boots with my  jeans rolled and adjusted accordingly, my factory worker's jacket is kept in pristine condition. Really apart from the solar charger embedded in my backpack, my  goggle/hat hybrid, and my military style  tip cut gloves I look like any other man, and yet these few additions confuse people who see it. 

Rusty, I think your outfit sounds really cool.

Hehe I like it. It may not be  necessarily true to the  "DP Standards." But I could never 100% follow the line of anything to begin with lol.

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