Dieselpunks

Dieselpunk + Steampunk Culture

Hi all,
My dark decopunk novel, THE CITY DARKENS, is free today for Kindle on Amazon. If you get it now, you'll have time to read it just before the sequel, AFTER THE FALL, comes out next week! I could really use some reviews, if you can find the time. But either way, please get your copy and, I hope, enjoy! And if you need a different ereader format, please email me at sophia-martin at hotmail, and I'll be happy to send you whatever format you prefer.

Here's the short version of the blurb:
After a decade of managing the family estate in the provinces, with only the rarest visit from her husband Reister, Myadar Sölbói is suddenly uprooted and brought to the glittering island capital. When Reister tears her son Bersi away from her, Myadar, ignorant and grief-stricken, attempts to navigate the royal court, but becomes a pawn in the political games of others.

Link to Amazon: http://amzn.to/1JatBuO

Thanks everyone!
- Sophia

Views: 462

Reply to This

Replies to This Discussion

What's "decopunk" and how is it different from dieselpunk?

Well... I've done as much reading about this as I can get my hands on, but I'm sure some might still disagree with me here. Still, my take on it is this: decopunk is dieselpunk with a lot less diesel and a lot more art deco.

While dieselpunk lovingly describes grimy machines and grease-covered mechanics and pilots, decopunk focuses instead on the architecture, fashion, etc. of the 1920s-40s. I do have some airplanes and a motorcycle in my novel, but they don't figure prominently. My mc spends a lot more time thinking about what people are wearing. :)

In some of what I've read decopunk is described as "optimistic" dieselpunk--like Sky Captain, for instance. That's why I tack on "dark"--to indicate that the optimistic aspect is missing from my novel. I wanted to look at the rise of fascism, so the fantasy setting is a dystopia.

Thanks for asking, Tome!

I think you might be splitting hairs for the sake of marketing, or you might have been misinformed about dieselpunk in general.

Take this definition of dieselpunk for example:

Dieselpunk is an art style that blends the spirit of the 1920s - 1950s with contemporary technology and attitude.

We all celebrate Art Deco (and its "decodance") as a part of dieselpunk, and don't make a distinction as it being separate from the whole.

I've I'm splitting hairs, I'm not alone! :)

There is, of course, the supposed two flavors of dieselpunk, Ottensian and Piecraftian. Ottensian seems to perhaps refer to that optimistic version of decopunk I mentioned, while Piecraftian is more dystopian. You can read what I'm talking about here, though I'm guessing you're already familiar:
http://www.ottens.co.uk/gatehouse/2008/05/the-two-flavors-of-diesel...
The trouble with those categories is neither fit with what I'm aiming for: a dystopian setting that emphasizes the art deco aesthetic.

I didn't come up with contrasting decopunk as focusing on the art deco side versus dieselpunk's grittier, machine-oriented focus, either. According to wiki, Sara M. Harvey did that in an interview, saying she defines decopunk as "shiner than DieselPunk."

And then others in the community have also discussed decopunk as a subgenre of dieselpunk, like this blog post:
http://www.cwhawes.com/2015/01/27/dieselpunk-or-decopunk/
And this definition on Wattpad:
https://www.wattpad.com/3020995-sf-sub-genre-definitions-decopunk
Though the latter emphasizes that optimism, again.

As for marketing, I've found that if anything, labeling my works as dieselpunk or decopunk outside of places like this one harms rather than helps my sales. People go, "WTF is decopunk?" and then keep scrolling. Mostly, I call it dark decopunk within the community of dieselpunks, so that potential readers familiar with the genre know what to expect going in--there aren't a lot of descriptions of engines or machines. There are a lot of descriptions of architecture, clothes, etc.

Tome Wilson said:

I think you might be splitting hairs for the sake of marketing, or you might have been misinformed about dieselpunk in general.

Take this definition of dieselpunk for example:

Dieselpunk is an art style that blends the spirit of the 1920s - 1950s with contemporary technology and attitude.

We all celebrate Art Deco (and its "decodance") as a part of dieselpunk, and don't make a distinction as it being separate from the whole.

Maybe I'm just getting too old.

Back when I started Dieselpunks about ten years ago, before it was an official website, there were two differing opinions on what dieselpunk could be.  At the time, steampunk hadn't taken off, and there were a handful of us who felt more kinship with the revolutions of the Jazz Age than the stilted leanings of the Victorian Era.  

On the one side, you had Nick Ottens and I talking in "The Smoking Lounge" of the Gatehouse forum (which you referenced) about Sky Captain and Indiana Jones, and "How could we expand on the worldbuilding of Fritz Lang's Metropolis."  In other words, how could we modernize the style and glamour that was evident between WWI and WWII?  

The only other Google hit at the time for "dieselpunk" was a user-wiki page (not even a Wikipedia article) from a user named "Piecraft."  He described "dieselpunk" as Mad Max and WaterWorld; something post-apocalyptic where the prevailing culture was dominated by big oily analog machines.

A few years later, Larry came along and tried to combine these two ideas together in a "grand unified theory" of dieselpunk.  The result was "Piecraftian dieselpunk," which followed Piecraft's love for Mad Max, and the other was "Ottensian dieselpunk," which was basically "steampunk in the jazz age" or "everything that's not Mad Max."

Whenever I see terms like "decopunk," "pulp-punk," "noirpunk," "pulpnoir," or "dieselpulp," it's always from a steampunk board filled with people who asked "what would we call it if we brought steampunk into the '20s and '30s," not knowing that the genre had been codified a decade earlier as "dieselpunk," and that the primary genre of "dieselpunk" is already inclusive of all these sub-definitions.

That's why I'm confused when I still see these variations out in the wild.  It's something I thought we settled years and years ago before the trend crested in 2012.

Well, I think they can all coexist quite happily, honestly. For me, it's just been about finding the right terms to pinpoint the subgenre. I still consider my two books to be dieselpunk. They're just *also* decopunk. And to be more specific, they're "dark decopunk." Dieselpunk is the best term to refer to the era, IMO, because you can periodize the -punks for the most part in terms of the most cutting edge fuel of the time (cyberpunk being a notable exception). So clockworks and regular machines in the steampunk era run on steam, and therefore clockpunk is a subgenre of steampunk. A clockpunk story would also be steampunk, but perhaps be more precisely termed clockpunk because the focus on the story was on clockworks. Period-wise, when the primary fuel becomes diesel, then the era has shifted to dieselpunk, but you can subcategorize a story as decopunk within that. The next fuel is atomic energy, bringing on atompunk. I suppose you could even argue that cyberpunk does connect, as the actions are "fueled" through computers and any "traveling" that mainly takes place in cyberpunk happens digitally.

Tome Wilson said:

Maybe I'm just getting too old.

Back when I started Dieselpunks about ten years ago, before it was an official website, there were two differing opinions on what dieselpunk could be.  At the time, steampunk hadn't taken off, and there were a handful of us who felt more kinship with the revolutions of the Jazz Age than the stilted leanings of the Victorian Era.  

On the one side, you had Nick Ottens and I talking in "The Smoking Lounge" of the Gatehouse forum (which you referenced) about Sky Captain and Indiana Jones, and "How could we expand on the worldbuilding of Fritz Lang's Metropolis."  In other words, how could we modernize the style and glamour that was evident between WWI and WWII?  

The only other Google hit at the time for "dieselpunk" was a user-wiki page (not even a Wikipedia article) from a user named "Piecraft."  He described "dieselpunk" as Mad Max and WaterWorld; something post-apocalyptic where the prevailing culture was dominated by big oily analog machines.

A few years later, Larry came along and tried to combine these two ideas together in a "grand unified theory" of dieselpunk.  The result was "Piecraftian dieselpunk," which followed Piecraft's love for Mad Max, and the other was "Ottensian dieselpunk," which was basically "steampunk in the jazz age" or "everything that's not Mad Max."

Whenever I see terms like "decopunk," "pulp-punk," "noirpunk," "pulpnoir," or "dieselpulp," it's always from a steampunk board filled with people who asked "what would we call it if we brought steampunk into the '20s and '30s," not knowing that the genre had been codified a decade earlier as "dieselpunk," and that the primary genre of "dieselpunk" is already inclusive of all these sub-definitions.

That's why I'm confused when I still see these variations out in the wild.  It's something I thought we settled years and years ago before the trend crested in 2012.

I guess what I'm trying to say is, I'm a part of your primary audience and I wasn't understanding what you were trying to communicate.

I understand. I hope I managed to explain things better!

"decopunk" would be a subset of dieselpunk. 

Apparently I missed out on being able to get it for free, or it was never free here. Oh well.

Maz

That's what I was saying! :) And if you're okay with sharing your email with me, I'd be happy to send you a copy. Is .mobi okay, or would you prefer another format?

Maz said:

"decopunk" would be a subset of dieselpunk. 

Apparently I missed out on being able to get it for free, or it was never free here. Oh well.

Maz

No worries. I'll message you my email address. Thanks.

Maz

Hi,

Thanks for the book. I just finished it last night.

Did anyone else here read it? i'd be curious to know what you thought.

Maz

Reply to Discussion

RSS

Stay in touch

FacebookTwitterRSS

Allied Powers

Diesel powered dieselpunk podcast
Dieselpunk Industries
Seance Media by Tome Wilson
Vnv Nation

© 2019   Created by Tome Wilson.   Powered by

Badges  |  Report an Issue  |  Terms of Service