Dieselpunks

Dieselpunk + Steampunk Culture

Give me one example of what you consider to be dieselpunk

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List one example of what you consider to be dieselpunk. 

With your example, describe why you think it is dieselpunk.

This example can be real or conceptual, and can span any genre of art, craft, or entertainment.

--

For example, I believe the song A Tap Dancer's Dilemma by Diablo Swing Orchestra is dieselpunk.

It opens with a swing-beat drum solo that was used predominantly in the 1930's.  From there it progresses to the hook, which is performed on heavily distorted electric cellos.  Then it launches into an opening performed by a brass section, and accompanied by a jazz piano.

The lyrics are sung in a distorted "gospel barker" tone, and are accompanied by a female close harmony section (a style popularized by The Andrews Sisters during the '40s), the bridge is performed in a non-distorted, technical guitar style, normally heard in '30s jazz guitar, and the lyrics have a pseudo-gospel feeling to them (harkening back to the roots of jazz).

Together, all of these disparate styles are mixed together in a post-modern way with contemporary production techniques, and include modern instruments and playing styles. 

The end result is altogether modern in it's performance, but still includes elements and themes that were popular during the Interbellum, which is why I consider it to be dieselpunk.

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Good point about the steampunks. Not only the airships to the moon but their love for advance automatons always seemed rather fantasy to me in that they function a higher levels than we can today with modern robotics.

So why can't we have a flying skyscraper? :)

Cap'n Tony said:
Fly? Very, very doubtful. Aerodynamically very unstable. Maybe with enough engines (more even than the several he proposed) it might briefly fly close to the water due to ground effect (ala the Soviet Ekranoplans and, some theorize, the Spruce Goose). Sustained, stable flight...I'd say no.

But if the Steampunks can have Zepplins to the Moon I think we deserve an transoceanic luxury flying wing.

Larry said:
Holy crap! Does anyone know if this thing could actually fly if it was built?

FYI, Larry et all, here's more on Bel Geddes and Airliner #4. Note the cutaway: this thing was to be an honest-to-god flying cruise ship!!

http://hotgates.stanford.edu/Bucky/dymaxion/belgeddes.htm


Larry said:
Good point about the steampunks. Not only the airships to the moon but their love for advance automatons always seemed rather fantasy to me in that they function a higher levels than we can today with modern robotics.

So why can't we have a flying skyscraper? :)

Cap'n Tony said:
Fly? Very, very doubtful. Aerodynamically very unstable. Maybe with enough engines (more even than the several he proposed) it might briefly fly close to the water due to ground effect (ala the Soviet Ekranoplans and, some theorize, the Spruce Goose). Sustained, stable flight...I'd say no.

But if the Steampunks can have Zepplins to the Moon I think we deserve an transoceanic luxury flying wing.

Larry said:
Holy crap! Does anyone know if this thing could actually fly if it was built?

Oh him! Reading that article I recognize him now from his work on the Futurama exhibit. I love the description of the plane in the article, "an airborne Titanic!" Probably fitting in more ways than one. :)

Cap'n Tony said:
FYI, Larry et all, here's more on Bel Geddes and Airliner #4. Note the cutaway: this thing was to be an honest-to-god flying cruise ship!!

http://hotgates.stanford.edu/Bucky/dymaxion/belgeddes.htm


I just went and watched the Garbage video, thanks for mentioning it. I hadn´t listened to them for years, was at a concert of theirs in Amsterdam once.
I'd say buying a car from the period and performing a total restauration is Dieselpunk at its finest.

No wait, DP at its finest is taking a MODERN object and making it look like it's from the period (cars, radio's etc)
The Ace 102 stapler:


They still make this. It has been manufactured virtually unchanged since the 1930s. In a corporate environment filled with cheap, plastic, blocky staplers, the 102 survives. Why? Because it works--utilitarian, yet sexy. It is just about the perfection of the stapler, that no modern design could improve upon.

Surprisingly, most of the action is in the watch industry - with scores of 30s- and 40s-styled models with a quartz "heart" or sophisticated automatic caliber.
Colin Wels said:
... taking a MODERN object and making it look like it's from the period (cars, radio's etc)
And to me, that right there is the core difference between Steampunk and Dieselpunk (appearances aside): Steampunk is primarily about transporting the present into the past, while Dieselpunk is primarily about bringing the past into the present.


Colin Wels said:
No wait, DP at its finest is taking a MODERN object and making it look like it's from the period (cars, radio's etc)

Other good examples are Zippo and IMCO lighters (since 1932 and 1919 respectively). Or Morgan cars.
W.A. Seaver said:
The Ace 102 stapler... They still make this. It has been manufactured virtually unchanged since the 1930s...
This particular picture:

I vaguely remember when I first saw it in a book of my Grandpa, I was barely able to read and the picture's subtitle told me, that this took place decades ago.
I was going something like "Decades ago? What happened?"
Silver, slippery shaped machines running on a gravity-defying track made of archaic bricks, and even the seams between the bricks told a story of speed and competition between daring men...

These cars, their speed and the banked curve must have had the impression of a Sci-Fi-Flick gone reality for the average man back then, and still they even hadn't tapped the full potential.
Speed Racer?

Dreddhead said:
This particular picture:

I vaguely remember when I first saw it in a book of my Grandpa, I was barely able to read and the picture's subtitle told me, that this took place decades ago.
I was going something like "Decades ago? What happened?"
Silver, slippery shaped machines running on a gravity-defying track made of archaic bricks, and even the seams between the bricks told a story of speed and competition between daring men...

These cars, their speed and the banked curve must have had the impression of a Sci-Fi-Flick gone reality for the average man back then, and still they even hadn't tapped the full potential.
Dreddhead, that photo reminds me of the Autopia scene from my 1956 View-Master set of Disneyland's Tomorrowland. I love how even the little boats in this slide of the Phantom Boat Ride reflect the gigantic fins that were popular on automobiles at the time, and the assumption that of course everything would still have huge fins decades into the future.

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