Dieselpunks

Dieselpunk + Steampunk Culture

Looking for a way to explain the differences in Dieselpunk vs. Steampunk via imagery

I'm trying to explain to an artsy friend of mine the differences between Dieselpunk and Steampunk, as they are firm to the point of not understanding these differences. In addition, I need these obvious differences in the form of "iconic*" Dieselpunk imagery. I'm not sure whether these belonged in the Photos tab, but I decided they'd pose better questions here. Any takers?


*If any Dieselpunk images can be attributed with the term 'iconic', this would be a really good time to post them.

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It's not really that difficult.

Steampunk

Victorian era
Bustles
Carriages
Frock Coats
Steam trains
Everyone pretending they're in high society even if they aren't (status and manners)
Imperialism
Artwork is predominantly created by hand and influenced by nature.
Crafts are almost certainly done by hand.
Artwork that places more emphasis on form than function (gilded edges and the end of the Rococo as signs of status)
Cowboys
Hot air balloons
Pilots as scientists

Dieselpunk

Everything between World War 1 and World War 2
Airplanes & Flying Aces
Zepellins
Pilots as adventurers
Cars
Lack of respect for humanity
Warfare
Depression
Roaring Twenties
Gangsters
Flappers
Artwork is predominantly influenced by machines and tools.
Artwork that places emphasis on function rather than form (streamlined machines)
I think Tome summed it up nicely.
The Rocketeer is a comic book hero inspired by the themes of dieselpunk: pin ups, flying aces, bad nazis.

The Mauser C/96 is an iconic pistol and one of the first semi-auto guns.

Futurism is the artistic style that inspires most of dieselpunk. Movement over form, planes, innovation.

Great illustrations, Leviathan.
~ Larry
What can be more iconic than Norman Bel Geddes' Airliner No.4?!

Wow, Eva. Where did you find those? Those are fantastic!


Eva Kamm said:
What can be more iconic than Norman Bel Geddes' Airliner No.4?!


Here it is.
Larry said:
Wow, Eva. Where did you find those? Those are fantastic!
Thanks!


Eva Kamm said:

Here it is.
Larry said:
Wow, Eva. Where did you find those? Those are fantastic!

As I understand it, steampunk is bigger, less aerodynamic, brass and wood. Dieselpunk's Art Deco, stream-liner, steel. Incidentally, zeppelins are common to both.

Airships are common to both, but the classic rigid Zeppelin from the glory days of airship travel... for example, the Hindenburg or Graf Zeppelin... is classic diesel. It makes my brain itch when I see someone using an image of the Graf in their Steampunk art. And I've seen plenty of that.

 

There does seem to be a period where there's some intermixing between what was steam and what will become diesel, during the late Edwardian years, and during the Great War.

 

To me, if there are automobiles and airplanes (and they aren't based on Victorian tech or sci-fi technology) and "golden age" airships, if the design is Deco and not Nouveau or before, then it's diesel, not steam.

 

 

You summed it up very nicely, Dreia.

Dreia M said:
To me, if there are automobiles and airplanes (and they aren't based on Victorian tech or sci-fi technology) and "golden age" airships, if the design is Deco and not Nouveau or before, then it's diesel, not steam.

 

 

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