Dieselpunks

Dieselpunk + Steampunk Culture

The weather is bad, so I had plenty of time for a new project: A crystal detector radio.

Technically it is very easy: A coil, a turnable capacitor, a headphone and a diode. Luckily I had in my spareparts an original radio crystal holder and a an old prewar headphone. A bit of plywood, glue, wood stain an schellac (as finish) and 24 hours of time.

This is the result: For testing I used a Germanium diode, the crystal will be connected later. The coil has 30 windings. As earth I used the water tap in my kitchen (I will make a more durable earth connected to my kitchen sink) and about 1 meter of wire as antenna. I was able to hear our local station (WDR 2 on 720 kHz, about 30 km from here) loud an clear. On the photos you can see the inside and the finished detector radio.

What I need is a more beautiful turning knob and a dial.

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http://www.sparkmuseum.com/CRYSTAL1.HTM A nice collection or early crystal radios.


Little Gem
United Specialties Co.
1922


Martian Big 4
Martian Mfg. Co.
1923


Martian Special
Martian Mfg. Co.
1924


Radiola I
1923


Philmore Selective
1931



Aeriola Jr.
1921


Giblin RadioEar
1921


Smith Cannery Machines Tyee
Manufactured in Seattle
c. 1923


United Cabinet
1924



Kenrad B-12
1923


Federal Jr.
1922


Marvel 101
1921


Kodel S-1
1924


Howe
1925


Lambert
1926


National Electric Supply
1922
 


Lemco Model 340
1924


Niehoff
c. 1922


Steinite Standard
1926


Deforest BC14A
1917
The BC14A was designed for use as an artillery spotting receiver during WW1.


 

 
Uncle Al's Radio Shop - Miracle
1925
 



Deforest Everyman
1922


Hunt & McCree Model 797
1912
This is one of the earliest commercial crystal sets and is the oldest crystal radio in my collection


Unknown
c. 1924
This looks like a Lemco set but unfortunately the label is missing


Adams Morgan
1912


Geiger
c. 1924


The Crystal Dyne
Bethlehem Radio Corp.
1929

Jubilee
1926


Large Demonstration Crystal Radio
 
Kilbourne & Clark

There were crystal radios about 15 years earlier. Some people even tried to transmit music from grammophon records as early as 1911. During WW I some operators transmitted music in the time time the transmitter was not needed. Not (just) for entertainment, but for tuning the receiver and building up antennas.

The militairs and governments realized very soon the importance of radio and made strict rules who is allowed to have a transmitter (and in many countries even who is allowed to have a receiver!) and what is allowed to be transmitted. So the first licences for commercial radio were given after WW I, the USA and the Netherlands were very early in 1919 "on air". Most other countries followed soon, after new rules and laws were defined.

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