Dieselpunks

Dieselpunk + Steampunk Culture

It's been a long time coming but the current issue of the peer reviewed journal Fashion, Style, and Popular Journal has published an article on Dieselpunk. The article, "Victorian gear heads and locomotive zealots: Vicarious nostalgia, retro-futurism and anachronisms of Steampunk and Dieselpunk", is the first that I know of in an academic setting that studies Dieselpunk. It includes photos of dieselpunks such as Chris ‘Jerrey Rough’ Dempsey, John Wilson, Pietro Magnani, and a good friend of mine Stacey Fox.

The article isn't necessarily flattering of either Dieselpunk or Steampunk. Nor is it free online. You can purchase a PDF copy of the article at the web site for $18.00

Following is the abstract on the official site:

This article explored the histories of both Steampunk and Dieselpunk with a focus on their dress behaviour and musical preferences as related to the ideologies of these groups. Particular attention was paid to both group’s fixations on nostalgia for periods outside of the individual members’ living memories and how this nostalgia is a feature of their consumption experiences. The article also addresses the anachronistic use of the word ‘punk’ in the name of each of these groups. There is an obvious incongruity with the naming of Steampunk and Dieselpunk because they are shameless consumer cultures with no obvious political inclinations. Although Steampunks and Dieselpunks do share the DIY aesthetic of the traditional punk subculture, their styles have been prefabricated, neatly packaged and made available for sale on any of the many websites devoted to providing the quintessential Victorian or diesel-era garb.

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$18?! I feel that is far too pretentious and makes me not even want to listen to their "opinion" further. Still, good mention, Larry. At least they see us Dieselpunks as a thing, unlike how Wikipedia did for a while lol

Blacky, your right about the mention. I think the most important thing about this article is that it helps with the issue of 'notability' that we had with Wiki.

On the cost, I'm not sure if it's more or less than others. You may be able to find the journal in a university library.

Erwin "Blacky" Blackthorn said:

$18?! I feel that is far too pretentious and makes me not even want to listen to their "opinion" further. Still, good mention, Larry. At least they see us Dieselpunks as a thing, unlike how Wikipedia did for a while lol

Shameless consumer culture! Yep, those era were when mass production and consumption became a thing. Why is that necessarily a bad thing. I'd like to read it, but 18 bucks for this is a bit much for my blood.

Nice find Larry.

I know I've been interviewed for tons of these things that never really saw the light of day.  I'm sure you have as well.  Glad to see one out in the wild.  As for their conclusions, I feel that their sample size was probably too small to get a real overview.  For one, I've never heard anything from these people personally or on any of the dieselpunk websites, and it's not like we're hard to find.

Thanks, Tome. I can't necessarily say that I found it because I know the professor and I knew it was going to be published at some point. She attended one of my North Texas Dieselpunks meetings while doing research for the article. Plus, at her request, I was the mediator for the photos of dieselpunks shown in the article, which is why all but one are members of this forum. In addition, this is the same journal that published my review of the fashion in the Luhrmann's Gatsby.

That being said, though I had knowledge that she was going to have an article published, I don't share all of her conclusions and had no advance knowledge of what those would be though they are consistent with comments she made to me in the past. I do think she's spot on for most steampunks. However, I think she's missed it on dieselpunks. Especially Lifestylers like you and I. I'm working on a blog post to address my concerns.

Tome Wilson said:

Nice find Larry.

I know I've been interviewed for tons of these things that never really saw the light of day.  I'm sure you have as well.  Glad to see one out in the wild.  As for their conclusions, I feel that their sample size was probably too small to get a real overview.  For one, I've never heard anything from these people personally or on any of the dieselpunk websites, and it's not like we're hard to find.

Professor Jessica Strübel, the author of the article, requested that I post this here in reply to this thread. These are her unedited words:

To Tome Wilson: he actually was one of the people who answered the interview questions. And the sample size was considered fjust fine for a qualitative study (and using A coefficient of reliability...otherwise, it wouldn't have been published)

Also, my article was not meant to offend or be critical of Dieselpunk....it was an social-psychological analysis of subcultures using post-subcultural theory (which is my schtick).

I appreciate you posting it and I hope people read it with an open mind and take it for what it is...a critical analysis of postmodern style tribes and not a bashing of Dieslepunk (nor Steampunk). I'm a fan of both, so that would mean I'm criticizing myself.

Was she going by the name of Jessi Meier back then?

Here's the only email I have with Strubel as a keyword, to which I received no reply.

November 21, 2012

Good evening, Dr. Strubel-Scheiner.

I hope you're taking some time off to be with family, in which case don't worry about replying to this email right away.

I was recently contacted by my good friend, Larry Amyett, regarding some photographs we have our website (www.Dieselpunks.org) and your request to republish them in your academic paper. Larry has already put in a good word for you, and we would be more than happy to accommodate your needs.

If you could point me to the photos you would like to use (URLs or email attachments are fine), I'll do my best to send you the highest quality versions I have available.

In return, I'm very interested in learning more about your study and how our aesthetic fits into your research as a whole. Dieselpunks takes up a good chunk of my life, so if you could forward me a copy of the paper when it's completed (for personal-review only, of course), I would truly appreciate it.

Thank you very much,

Tome Wilson
Owner/Editor of Dieselpunks

Hi Tome,

No, that was my graduate assistant. She was working for me.


Tome Wilson said:

Was she going by the name of Jessi Meier back then?

I may be wrong, but, (judging from the provided abstract) I think the author missed an important point: Diesel era is an era of mass-production, so mix-and-match of prefabricated goods seems well-suited:)

Nevertheless, I agree that there is much more consumerism in D-Punk and S-Punk than in "original" Punk:) personally, I've taken some time to "tune" pants and shirts "the punk way" back in school days, while I hardly remember doing anything of a kind for "diesel/steam" look. At the same time, these days one can buy much more punk stuff prefabricated as well, while I know there are plenty of steam- and dieselpunks DIYing a lot.

My response to the academic paper: Going Against the Grain.

Great piece of text, Larry. I hope Prof. Strubel will participate in the discussion as well.

Larry said:

My response to the academic paper: Going Against the Grain.

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