Dieselpunks

Dieselpunk + Steampunk Culture

Re-reading of Cap'n Tony's excellent article made me search for classic cocktail recipes - just to refresh my very basic knowledge of this exciting subject. Almost immediately I stumbled upon a good entry-level resource for making 1920s theme parties. Not much in the cocktail department there, half a dozen recipes - but elsewhere, there's more than I can shake / stir / consume. How about a multi-color Pousse Cafe?

More than 20 variations of this mix.

Monkey Gland was very popular in the 20s, despite its strange name:

And Luigi is a sweeter alternative to Martini:

Two names puzzled me: Coffee Cocktail (should I serve it in espresso cup?) and Aviation (why Aviation, can you tell me pleeease?). And finally - a jolly recipe with a charming story not associated with Prohibition. Cheers!

Views: 642

Reply to This

Replies to This Discussion

Interesting post. Beautiful photos with it too. While I don't have an opinion on the drinks the link you included for 1920's themed parties I  think is an excellent resource for dieselpunks in general.

Great stuff, Eva, and thanks for the nod (I'd wondered why I was suddenly getting replies to a 7 month old article).

 

I'll have to try the Monkey Gland. I even have the absinthe (it's legal again in VA).

 

I'd assume the Aviation got its name just to sound sleek, fast, and modern. Though perhaps there's a tie in to the old Clipper Cocktail Pan Am served on their flying boats:

 

Clipper Cocktail:

1.5 Oz. light rum

0.5 Oz dry Vermouth

Shake and serve over cracked ice.

Dash of Grenadine allowed to sink to the bottom.

I'll have a monkey gland, please.

Hi everybody. Sorry to bump an old thread, but I thought I could clear up a few questions...

 

As far as the "Coffee Cocktail", nobody knows why it's named that. The first time it is mentioned is in Jerry Thomas' "The Bon Vivant's Companion" in 1862. He acknowledges this misnomer, as there is neither coffee nor any bitters (the defining characteristic of a cocktail in the 19th century) in the drink. It does, however, kinda look like coffee when it is made.

 

The Aviation is probably named as such because one of the ingredients that was originally in it, Creme de Violette, would turn the drink a sky blue color. The Creme de Violette, however, was out of production for some time (it has only recently come back on the market), so it was just dropped from the recipe.

 

And the "Monkey Gland"...? Well, probably named after Dr. Serge Voronoff, who transplanted monkey testicles onto men for "therapeutic purposes" in the 1920s and 30s...

 

Again, I'm the FNG, so sorry if this has already been cleared up.

Not at all, BartenderKyle, and welcome aboard! That's great information all around.

I hope you can keep providing such insights on cocktails...feel free to check out my Cap'n's Cabaret articles, as I include an old time cocktail in each episode. Feel free to drop any more info you have on the drinks there.

Cap'n, can you provide a link to your Cabaret? I didn't catch it earlier.

 

I just saw a history channel or science channel bit on Dr. Serge Voronoff. Freaky.

 

Plus, I was wondering if anyone could tell me when the Dark and Stormy was officially called Dark and Stormy. I have some of my characters drinking them in 1918, but I couldn't find a date on the name for the drink.

Well, rum has been around since the 17th century, and became a part of the British Navy's rations sometime in the 18th century (the date escapes me at the moment), and ginger beer has been around for almost as long, so I'm sure people have been mixing them for a couple hundred years. The New York Times says the Dark N Stormy as we know it (2oz Gosling's, splash of ginger beer and a lime wedge) first appeared sometime after WWI, and Gosling's trademarked the name in 1991.


David Mark Brown said:

Cap'n, can you provide a link to your Cabaret? I didn't catch it earlier.

 

I just saw a history channel or science channel bit on Dr. Serge Voronoff. Freaky.

 

Plus, I was wondering if anyone could tell me when the Dark and Stormy was officially called Dark and Stormy. I have some of my characters drinking them in 1918, but I couldn't find a date on the name for the drink.

It's a series of Articles, typically come out every Sat or Sun evening as time permits. #6 is available on the main page articles section (top left hand side) right now, or search for Articles, keyword "CapsCab"

David Mark Brown said:

Cap'n, can you provide a link to your Cabaret? I didn't catch it earlier.

 



BartenderKyle said:

Well, rum has been around since the 17th century, and became a part of the British Navy's rations sometime in the 18th century (the date escapes me at the moment), and ginger beer has been around for almost as long, so I'm sure people have been mixing them for a couple hundred years. The New York Times says the Dark N Stormy as we know it (2oz Gosling's, splash of ginger beer and a lime wedge) first appeared sometime after WWI, and Gosling's trademarked the name in 1991.


David Mark Brown said:

Cap'n, can you provide a link to your Cabaret? I didn't catch it earlier.

 

I just saw a history channel or science channel bit on Dr. Serge Voronoff. Freaky.

 

Plus, I was wondering if anyone could tell me when the Dark and Stormy was officially called Dark and Stormy. I have some of my characters drinking them in 1918, but I couldn't find a date on the name for the drink.


Thanks. My characters are drinking it in 1918 and calling it a Dark and Stormy, so I might be pushing things a bit. But it is an alternate history, so I might be o.k.

Reply to Discussion

RSS

Stay in touch

FacebookTwitterRSS

Allied Powers

Diesel powered dieselpunk podcast
Dieselpunk Industries
Seance Media by Tome Wilson
Vnv Nation

© 2019   Created by Tome Wilson.   Powered by

Badges  |  Report an Issue  |  Terms of Service