Dieselpunks

Dieselpunk + Steampunk Culture

Several of the discussions here reminded me of this article at The Gatehouse,"The Two Flavors of Dieselpunk." In an excerpt from the article:
Elaborating upon the observations of The Flying Fortress about the genre, we have established two kinds of dieselpunk, differing in setting, style and influence. The “Ottensian,” of which Sky Captain and the World of Tomorrow (2004) is representative, is typically set in a 1930s that was never bothered by a Great Depression and is therefore more of a continuation of the Roaring Twenties; its optimism and excitement only strengthened by further progress. This buoyant and most pervasive of “Ottensian” dieselpunk shares its era with more film noir-styled, hard-boiled detective stories such as The Shadow (1994) and The Big O, which depict the negative effects of the era’s laissez-faire attitude: the rise of totalitarianism, technocratic perception, and the “grit and oil [and] dust and mud”5 of pollution.

On the other side of World War II we find the “Piecraftian” dieselpunk, shaped by an alternate outcome of the war: often Axis victory but sometimes a three-way Cold War reminiscent of Nineteen-Eighty-Four. Either way, the war is typically depicted as having been prolonged with advanced technologies based upon real-world Nazi experiments with rocketry, jet aircraft, and eugenics and the occult. Sometimes the “Piecraftian” is set during the later stages of the war, as is the case with video games like Return to Castle Wolfenstein (2001) and War Front: Turning Point (2007). Often, however, it is characterized by dystopia and nuclear paranoia, and the development of evermore agressive technologies of war and the conquest of space by Nazi-Germany—in Philip K. Dick’s The Man in the High Castle (1962) and Energia Productions’s Iron Sky (2008).

Finally, the darker side of the “Piecraftian” is truly hopeless, for in the post-apocalyptic environments of Mad Max (1979), Radioactive Dreams (1985), Yukito Kishiro’s Battle Angel Alita and Kevin Costner’s Waterworld (1995), there is no chance of recovery, no hope for a better future; only an everlasting struggle for survival.


I consider myself Ottensian Dieselpunk. I was wondering in which category other's considered themselves.

Views: 4681

Reply to This

Replies to This Discussion

Sounds interesting to me! But I guess I may not reflect the culture at large...


John David Hughes said:

I'm mostly Piecraftian; as much as I loved Sky Captain and the World of Tomorrow, I don't much enjoy high adventure as much as the depths of extremist political movements and the technology of WWII.

One thing I think Dieselpunk - and in fact, most Punk genre's - is missing is an analogue to epic fantasy. I want to see an original setting based not on medieval Europe, but WWII. Though this wouldn't really be Punk any more, I suppose.

Still, I want to see it so much I'm writing it myself. Not sure how much interest there might be in such a thing, but damn it I'm doing it anyway!

And I'm 100% behind Komissar Hass here; Piecraftian muddy trenches, loud tanks and gasmasks juxtaposed with the Ottensian stuff. In the same way comedic relief makes tragedy more tragic, these two Dieselpunk styles contrast each other excellently. But I still prefer Piecraftian.

like both of your styles in films and books however my normal look is more post apocalyptic.

To me it's clearly Ottensian. I love the music, the movies, the drinks and of course anything with glowing valves in it.

Ottensian, but I do have to have bad guys to punch, which would I suppose come from the piecraftian dark side.

Piecraftian..much as Komissar Haas stated. Before I got interested in Steampunk (although never actively), I was into Cyberpunk. I love the dark dystopian kind of guy. I'm a fan of metal , punk , goth & Electro-Industrial music , with a growing interest in swing.

I am definitely Ottensian. I tend to look at the positive end of things and try to do that and everything. I feel the  20s and 30s were the last time humanity was united for a purpose.  While the world was suffering from depression there was always hope  and belief things would get better and technology would be helping things get better.  Even World War II had this belief some of the time. With this belief in mind I tend to carry it over into World War II. I find alternate histories of World War II to be completely fascinating.

@Larry the link for the article doesn´t work

I considered myself as Ottesian too, mostly with the flavors you mentioned on your article on "El Investigador" "Dieselpunk: from Hope to Horror" I think put very clear any piece of posibilities in both, so many would think they are Piecrafnian but really they are Dark Ottesians, like me.

:) 

Nick Ottens has either taken down the page or moved it to a link I can't find. So I fixed the link using the Waybackmachine web site and it now works. I appreciate you posting this because I wasn't aware.

Also, thanks for letting me write for El Investigador. It's an excellent magazine. 

N. Inmunsapá said:

@Larry the link for the article doesn´t work

I considered myself as Ottesian too, mostly with the flavors you mentioned on your article on "El Investigador" "Dieselpunk: from Hope to Horror" I think put very clear any piece of posibilities in both, so many would think they are Piecrafnian but really they are Dark Ottesians, like me.

:) 

I originally responded to this as Piecraftian, if I remember correctly. Looking at it now I think the Dark Ottensian is the better description.

Aesthetically, I'm into both for different reasons. I'd say my sensibilities lean more Ottensian. Both are good fun, though. Fuse 'em when I can.

I'm a Cooligan!
I believe my interests are mostly Ottensian. I really like all of art deco. My real interest is in the 1939 Worlds Fair concept of "The World Of Tomorrow" (which they believed would begin in 1960)

Reply to Discussion

RSS

Stay in touch

FacebookTwitterRSS

Allied Powers

Diesel powered dieselpunk podcast
Dieselpunk Industries
Seance Media by Tome Wilson
Vnv Nation

© 2019   Created by Tome Wilson.   Powered by

Badges  |  Report an Issue  |  Terms of Service