Dieselpunks

Dieselpunk + Steampunk Culture

Hi everybody.

I'm still relatively new to the genre of Dieselpunk but find this whole thing fascinating and exciting, so much so that I've begun conceptualizing my first (and hopefully not last) Dieselpunk novel.  However, I find myself at a bit of a loss as I'm not terribly familiar as to what is and is not acceptable in the genre and everything I've come across so far is just a rehashing of Dieselpunk in general and how it relates to the other Punks.  If anybody has more detailed information they might be willing to share or possibly some references I could look into, I'd greatly appreciate the help.

Views: 267

Replies to This Discussion

Hello Novus,

I assume since this the author's forum, you're referring to writing and books. As for what is and is not acceptable, you'll find that there are very little hard and fast rules when it comes to punking your writing with diesel. Generally, and I'm sure others will chime in, the subject matter will relate in some way to the era of World Wars and Jazz Age. (Right about the end of WWI to about when they dropped the atom bomb, give or take a few years.) What you can do with that era is pretty much endless.

Personally, I write a series called the Troubleshooter, which takes a lot from the mobster and private eye material from that period and drops it in a dystopian future. I can then create material completely free of any historical significance while retaining markedly distinct dieselpunk tropes. Many other writers create stories withing the actual events of that time, dropping in historical figures and events, 'punking' their writing with elements like science fiction and supernatural.

But if you're looking for a definitive standard of what is dieselpunk, I believe you'll find the answers vary depending on what source you're exploring. It's my belief that Dieselpunk as a culture is still being established, and all of the various contributors are collectively cementing what the actual 'brand' is.

Hey, this is a great question! A few places I look for inspiration are art deco architecture and furniture, classic posters and fashions, novels of the time, "visions of the future" esque articles from places such as Popular Mechanics, and the like. A good thing to keep in mind is that MOST Dieselpunk spans the eras of 1920-1950, plus or minus some years. Good examples of Dieselpunk (again, for me.) are Crimson Skies the video game, Sky Captain and the World of Tomorrow, the Rocketeer (comics and movie) silver age comics, the Indiana Jones movies, film noir, the Agent Carter series, the Captain America movie, and various pulp and noir films and books. Other inspirations include Lovecraft and Wells novels, as well as news articles from the time. Hope at least some of this helps!

Edit: I can't believe I forgot to mention one of my favorite source movies of all time for this genre, Atlantis: The Lost Empire! It is an animated 2d feature film from Disney, and personifies a lot of what Dieselpunk is to me.

Hi Novus Draconis and welcome to Dieselpunks ^_^

I've been researching this topic myself, becuase many people insisted my writing isn't dieselpunk because it isn't retrofuturistic. I'm one of those writers Bard refered to who write within the historical events and punk them with supernatural elements. 

You can find my thoughts on Dieselpunk in one of my posts
http://theoldshelter.com/international-dieselpunk-day-2015/
Most of which is based on reflections about the genre I heard on the Diesel Powered Podcast
https://dieselpoweredpodcast.wordpress.com/
That's a fantastic place where to make up your mind abotu Dieselpunk ;-)

Hope this helps ^_^

Hi Novus :) Welcome on all levels to the world of retro-future diesel :) I agree with everything Bard, Jazzfeathers, and Jacob pointed out. My own flavor of dieselpunk follows much of the aforementioned. I'm writing a series which takes place in an alternate dieselpunk universe. It's not our own, but it's similar. I weave elements of history, pulp, noir, vintage sci-fi, cyberpunk, the supernatural, art deco styles, space opera, and Jazz Age culture into my stories. Bard is right, the possibilities of what you can do with the time period is endless. I'd suggest picking the historical elements you enjoy and then applying the speculative twists of your choice to give it the retro-future edge. The 'punk' element is important to me as well, and I try to emphasize it in all of my work--this mainly being a sense of rage and rebellion, anti-establishment, and a do-it-yourself/finger in the face of authority attitude.

Of course reading other dieselpunk authors is highly beneficial. I haven't read any of Jacob's work yet, but I can vouch that Bard and Jazzfeathers are dieselpunk authors extraordinaire ;) A book I read recently which I loved and believe captures diesel/decopunk well is "Radiance" by Catherynne M. Valente. Best of luck in your wanderings through this burgeoning sub-genre!

I personally don't have any concrete work yet, it is very much still in the scatter shot out of a cannon stage of writing, hah! I'll maybe have some short stories rolling soon if I can get them polished enough to write down though. The main inspiration fuel I have right now is my art, such as it is! Also I'll have to look up that book, it sounds interesting.



Holly Gonzalez said:

Of course reading other dieselpunk authors is highly beneficial. I haven't read any of Jacob's work yet, but I can vouch that Bard and Jazzfeathers are dieselpunk authors extraordinaire ;) A book I read recently which I loved and believe captures diesel/decopunk well is "Radiance" by Catherynne M. Valente. Best of luck in your wanderings through this burgeoning sub-genre!

Aw, thanks for the nice words, Holly. 

Hey, I haven't heard of that book yet. I'm going hunting it down. Thanks for mentioning it ^_^

Good to know, in which case I'd love to see some of your art! I'm struggling to finish an atompunk short story today myself.  Deadline is tomorrow and I'm procrastinating like a fiend...ugh. Best of luck to you!

Jacob Savage said:

I personally don't have any concrete work yet, it is very much still in the scatter shot out of a cannon stage of writing, hah! I'll maybe have some short stories rolling soon if I can get them polished enough to write down though. The main inspiration fuel I have right now is my art, such as it is! Also I'll have to look up that book, it sounds interesting.



Holly Gonzalez said:

Of course reading other dieselpunk authors is highly beneficial. I haven't read any of Jacob's work yet, but I can vouch that Bard and Jazzfeathers are dieselpunk authors extraordinaire ;) A book I read recently which I loved and believe captures diesel/decopunk well is "Radiance" by Catherynne M. Valente. Best of luck in your wanderings through this burgeoning sub-genre!

Absolutely :). It's really good, a strange and surreal read, but so worth it!


JazzFeathers said:

Aw, thanks for the nice words, Holly. 

Hey, I haven't heard of that book yet. I'm going hunting it down. Thanks for mentioning it ^_^

Thanks, everybody.  I'm sure everything will be of great help.

RSS

Stay in touch

FacebookTwitterRSS

Allied Powers

Diesel powered dieselpunk podcast
Dieselpunk Industries
Seance Media by Tome Wilson
Vnv Nation

© 2019   Created by Tome Wilson.   Powered by

Badges  |  Report an Issue  |  Terms of Service