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Jake Holman Jr.
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Articles by Jake Holman Jr.

ZH-29: Czech's angled barrel rifle

The annals of small arms designs are filled with near perfect, odd and/or unsuccessful weapons. The Czech tradition of innovative small arms designs began in the early 20th century and continues to this day. In the 1920s, however, there was a semi-automatic rifle that should have received more attention, the ZH-29.A well-made rifle,…See More
Mar 13, 2013
Articles by Jake Holman Jr.

Japan's Three Barreled Flare Gun

The Japanese Nambu Type 90 flare gun is one odd looking pistol. Weighing in at almost four pounds, the Nambu flare gun was designed for the Japanese Imperial Navy. Called the Type 90 (for the Japanese calendar year it was created) it was a 28mm flare gun.There are four different levers and controls on this simple pistol. The first…See More
Feb 27, 2013
Articles by Jake Holman Jr.

Japan's Three Barreled Flare Gun

The Japanese Nambu Type 90 flare gun is one odd looking pistol. Weighing in at almost four pounds, the Nambu flare gun was designed for the Japanese Imperial Navy. Called the Type 90 (for the Japanese calendar year it was created) it was a 28mm flare gun.There are four different levers and controls on this simple pistol. The first…See More
Feb 22, 2013
Articles by Jake Holman Jr.

One Big Gas Gun

The Manville is one heck of an angry looking gun. If you've seen the Christopher Walken classic, Dogs of War, you've seen this gun's cousin. But in the 1930s a machinist had an idea for a large capacity gas gun for use by police during riots.The Manville essentially is a large revolver, that was born in 1936 as a 12 gauge…See More
Feb 13, 2013
Articles by Jake Holman Jr.

Tandem Fed Vesely Machine Carbine

When a Czech immigrant arrived in Great Britain his claim to fame would not be a successful entry to the firearms canon, but rather an intriguing footnote that showed ingenuity could be matched with reliability. The never ending search for larger capacity firearms, whether they were pistols or rifles, drove weapons designers…See More
Feb 6, 2013
Articles by Jake Holman Jr.

Beercrate Flak of World War II

Allied airmen had to face every manner of threat when penetrating the skies over the Reich. From Focke Wulf fighters to deadly German "88s" the air over Europe was filled with threats a plenty. But as the Reich crumbled and the Allied moved deeper in the lands of Germany, a series of last ditch weapons were fielded,…See More
Jan 23, 2013
Articles by Jake Holman Jr.

Raffica!

The compact and easy to use semi-automatic pistol has sat on the hip of officers and enlisted men for over a century. But the pistol was always a weapon of last resort, something for when the enemy was close and death imminent. And so, from time to time, there was a notion to turn handguns into minute machine pistols. Today, Glock…See More
Jan 9, 2013
Articles by Jake Holman Jr.

From the Ashes: Italy's post-war combat rifle

In the throws of defeat, flailing helplessly against the advancing Allied tide and executing their leader, Il Duce, Italy rose from the ashes of World War II needing to rebuild its military from the ground up.What is the underpinning of a standing army, but its rifle of choice? Instead of turning to domestically designed weapons,…See More
Dec 26, 2012
Articles by Jake Holman Jr.

Pistol Packing Shutter Bug

Late last year I wrote about the what's old is new again craze of mounting illumination to weapons. Nearly a year later I am diving back into the idea of weapon's accesories, but this time the idea of mounting a…See More
Nov 14, 2012
Articles by Jake Holman Jr.

Slim Straight Recoil of the Campo-Giro

A far as aesthetics go, the Campo-Giro is one sleek little pistol. And it was born at the dawn of the 20th century.In Weapons of War I've profiled a number of different methods of operation for pistols, from locking toggles to Browning actions. The Campo-Giro Model 1913 was simple in how it operated. The slim semi-automatic pistol…See More
Oct 31, 2012
Articles by Jake Holman Jr.

Great Rifle, Bad Timing: FN Model 1949

Sometimes a great rifle comes along and doesn't quite get its due. Sometimes its mischambered in an under-powered ammunition. Other times it falls victim to bad timing. That is the legacy of the stout and much overlooked Fabrique Nationale Model 1949.Born in the years before the outbreak of World War II, the FN Model 49 was…See More
Oct 17, 2012
Articles by Jake Holman Jr.

Sweden's Skeleton LMG

Light machine guns have for the past 40 years been primarily belt-fed. While in the first half of the last century magazines were just as common, if not more, in light machine gun designs. Every nation seemed to come up with its own indigenous light machine gun design. From Sweden we have a magazine fed light machine gun that…See More
Oct 3, 2012
Articles by Jake Holman Jr.

Two Barrels, Two Calibers, One Gun: Game Getter

A simple backwoods gun, something that has two calibers that can handle anything you throw at it. A true American style firearms coveted by woodsmen that roved the continent for hundreds of years. In Europe 'Drilling" guns are well known. Here in the US they're a bit more a niche, something you carry as a backwoods back-up,…See More
Sep 19, 2012
Articles by Jake Holman Jr.

Another French Folding SMG

Some time ago I wrote about the stylized and long lived MAT-49 SMG from France. But it wasn't the only collapsing weapon to come from the minds of Gallic engineers.The Hotchkiss Universal Type submachine gun wasn't anything…See More
Sep 5, 2012
Articles by Jake Holman Jr.

Brick Magazine from Argentina

Magazines come in two basic types, single or double stack, meaning rounds are stacked in a single row or slightly staggered, doubling capacity and creating wider magazine. This is model has been standared for pistols, submachine guns and rifles for 70+ years, with the occasional "stick magazine" aberration.In 1938 however, Argentina…See More
May 23, 2012
Articles by Jake Holman Jr.

Italy's Obscure SMG

Despite have a long distinguished firearms heritage, Italian smallarms makers during World War II seemed to have floundered in attempts to make the next great advance in weapons designs. They came close quite often, but inevitably fell short when finding that right next generation weapon. And while other weapons makers were utilizing…See More
May 16, 2012

Profile Information

Everything in a Snap Shot

I guess this is an informal 411 on Jake Holman (aka Kev from Boston.) I am an unabashed lover of history (three history tomes for every non-fiction book.) Plop down a book on the Middle East and I will devour it. Have an interesting hardcover on an obscure facet of the Abrahamic faiths, I will read it in a night. And dare drop a book on World War II at my feet I will read it so thoroughly I will leave the pages smoking from my frenzied consumption.

It's been said I am one part Steve McQueen from Sand Pebbles and another part Lee Marvin from the Dirty Dozen. Passionate Red Sox fan, tireless defender of the Bay State and a man that's never seen a cup of coffee or pint of beer that he didn't love.

Oh, and, I am actually a veteran newspaper journalist (reformed,) freelance writer and finder of a newly rekindled love for the art of pulpy action stories (think Robert E. Howard meets Alan Moore.)

~ I am either a writer with drinking problems or a drinker with writing problems~
Brendan Behan

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Jake Holman Jr.'s Articles

Soviet Assault Dart Gun

Posted on February 25, 2015 at 11:30am 1 Comment

Through the history of modern small-arms development the concept of ultra-high velocity ammunition has risen to the top of designers in both East and West. An example of the ultra-high velocity ammunition is the flechette.

A metal dart, the flechette is often sabotted in single rounds to be fired out of individual…

Continue

ZH-29: Czech's angled barrel rifle

Posted on March 13, 2013 at 2:00pm 3 Comments

The annals of small arms designs are filled with near perfect, odd and/or unsuccessful weapons. The Czech tradition of innovative small arms designs began in the early 20th century and continues to this day. In the 1920s, however, there was a semi-automatic rifle that should have received more attention,…

Continue

Japan's Three Barreled Flare Gun

Posted on February 27, 2013 at 2:00pm 0 Comments

The Japanese Nambu Type 90 flare gun is one odd looking pistol. Weighing in at almost four pounds, the Nambu flare gun was designed for the Japanese Imperial Navy. Called the Type 90 (for the Japanese calendar year it was created) it was a 28mm flare gun.…

Continue

One Big Gas Gun

Posted on February 13, 2013 at 2:00pm 1 Comment

The Manville is one heck of an angry looking gun. If you've seen the Christopher Walken classic, Dogs of War, you've seen this gun's cousin. But in the 1930s a machinist had an idea for a large capacity gas gun for use by police during riots.

The Manville essentially is a large revolver, that…

Continue

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At 2:07pm on May 1, 2011, Doug said…

A fellow member, Tome Wilson, suggested you may be of help in my quest for information on the Colt Vickers 11 mm aircraft machine gun, model 1918. There is precious little online that relates to its air use. What I can find is more about the .303 or the ground-use application or converting the 11 mm for ground-use.

I'm in Canada and recently acquired a deactivated Colt Vickers  and it's a little out of my league as I collect flintlock and cap and ball pistols. I don't even know what half the parts are, who used this gun and on what planes. About now you may be wondering why I bought this gun...well it's a Colt, it has history, it may have come off of a WW1  fighter plane like a Sopwith Camel or a Spad XIII, the price was right and you can't help but admire the enginerring that went into it.

Every site I visit gives me a snippet of information but the next one contradicts the previous findings. Many are well meaining  but unsuppored opinions. Do you know where I can find schematics to identify the parts? Are the brass gears (on the left side) part of the Constantinesco sychronizing gear?  Who used the gun?  I know the RAF used the Vickers .303 and I've learned the 11 mm was needed for incenduary reasons but there is no refernce to them using the Colt to meet the 11 mm need. The French used the 11 mm but here again I can find no direct evidence that they used the Colt Vickers 11 mm. The only info I can find about use by the U.S. concerns a maverick balloon buster ace who had his ground crew mount one on his plane but it seemed like an exception.

I shouldn't have gone into all this detail and I guess it's to demonstrate the everending list of dead ends I've encountered for two weeks. I'm looking for any information about this gun as well as the history as it directly relates to its use as an air weapon.

Thanks, Doug

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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At 6:30pm on October 28, 2009, lord_k said…
Welcome onboard!
 
 
 

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