Dieselpunks

Dieselpunk + Steampunk Culture

November 2010 Articles (77)

The Grey Griffins Scavenger Hunt

With the wind at our backs and the spirit of adventure in our hearts, Dieselpunks is proud to present The Grey Griffins Scavenger Hunt. Created by JS Lewis and Derek Benz, Grey Griffins is a steampunk adventure novel mixing equal parts Hellboy with Harry Potter that fans of Leviathan and Boneshaker will love. To promote the newest book in the Grey Griffins series, we're offering our loyal members a free autographed copy along with a poster pack for…

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Added by Tome Wilson on November 30, 2010 at 11:00pm — 5 Comments

Art Deco Web Site

I found this site earlier today and found it to be a very interesting resource on Art Deco: Art Deco Style - The Ultimate Guide to Art Deco.

The site covers the definition of Art Deco, fashion, art, jewelry, interior design and much more.


Added by Larry on November 30, 2010 at 9:19pm — 2 Comments

Good Review for Crazy Taylor

My steam/dieselpunk novel has just garnered a good review!

http://masteranthonystevens.com/2010/11/27/crazy-taylor-review/

This has to flavor of an old 1930’s movie plot, with brave adventurous pilots and braver women. It’s reminiscent of a Saturday
Morning movie serial, that keeps you asking, “And what happens next?”

Added by Anthony Stevens on November 30, 2010 at 3:34pm — 2 Comments

Art Nouveau poster from the 1920s


Poster for Job Cigarette Papers
Manuel Orazi
ca. 1920s

Added by Tome Wilson on November 30, 2010 at 2:49pm — 2 Comments

Two Fisted Tuesdays with Philip Marlowe - The Grim Echo

Welcome to Two Fisted Tuesdays, Dieselpunks' weekly beat on the mean streets.

Starring Gerald Mohr and starting with the famous lines, "Get this and get it straight! Crime is a sucker's road and those who travel it wind up in the gutter, the prison or the grave." The Adventures of Philip Marlowe runs about 25 minutes without commercials. You can listen to this blast from the past in MP3 format for free at the link below.…

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Added by Tome Wilson on November 30, 2010 at 12:00pm — No Comments

The Art of Abram Games

Abram Games, whose real name was Abraham Gamse, was born in Whitechapel, London, in 1914.

His father, Joseph Gamse, a Latvian photographer, changed the family name to Games. For a while Abram Games attended St Martins School of Art in London but, disillusioned by the style of teaching and deterred by the high tuition fees, Abram Games soon left the art school. From 1932 until 1936, Abram Games worked…

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Added by lord_k on November 30, 2010 at 6:30am — 3 Comments

It's Getting Chilly (Keep 'em Coming for the Expo!)

I know you're probably all stuffed with various harvest holiday fare, but let us think of those who cannot partake. Let us warm our hearts for...the machines. There's still time to put together your Exhibition entries for November's topic for the Exhibition. Don't be shy!



November: Welcome To The Machine - Of course, no great run of prosperity comes without the work that

makes it happen, and to the Diesel era, that meant… Continue

Added by Athenaprime on November 29, 2010 at 11:43am — No Comments

The Timekeeper - Steampunk computer

There's something magical about looking at a good looking piece of steampunk art, and knowing that it actually does something. I'm not knocking the rayguns and hot-glued gadgets prevalent in steampunk art, but dammit I want a real raygun that could really disintegrate my neighbors car when her alarm goes off at 6am.



So, when I see a fine looking casemod, it makes… Continue

Added by Tome Wilson on November 29, 2010 at 10:00am — No Comments

Miskatonic Mondays - TinTin versus the Lovecraft Mythos

Miskatonic University Lights out, everybody.

On Miskatonic Mondays, we celebrate the "weird" fiction of HP Lovecraft and the genre of otherworldly horror that it spawned.

This week, we're showcasing the strange works of artist Murray Groat. While his gallery is full of the surreal and sometimes comical, I was most excited to see his fabulous mashup of Hergé's boy-adventurer TinTin stumbling into the world of HP Lovecraft. His beautiful pieces can be seen below.…



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Added by Tome Wilson on November 29, 2010 at 8:30am — 2 Comments

Pneumatic Mail, Part 3

This is the last chapter of our tube mail saga.

After a Steampunk-flavored historic overview and an inevitable "How does it work?" article, it's time to concentrate on pneumatic communications of the Diesel Era and also on the part played by these glorious tubes in fiction, Utopian and… Continue

Added by lord_k on November 29, 2010 at 6:30am — 2 Comments

Noir of the Week

I just came across this blog "Noir of the Week." Every week the blogger, Steve O, reviews a different film noir. According to the blog the owner Steve O also manages the official message board for the Film Noir Foundation.


Added by Larry on November 28, 2010 at 8:30pm — 1 Comment

Sunday Streamline #11: Japanese Designs

Look at this poster. Do you see a strange object under the flag?

What's it - a Shinkansen? No, this poster was printed almost three decades before the first Bullet Train, in 1937. The object represents a streamline narrow-gauge steam locomotive No. 5343. It belonged to quite unremarkable C53 class of Japanese…

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Added by lord_k on November 28, 2010 at 6:30am — No Comments

Killer Serials - Les Vampires #1 - The Severed Head

Welcome to the Killer Serials on Dieselpunks.

Killer Serials is our segment on Dieselpunks for showcasing cliffhangers and serial thrillers from Hollywood's golden age.

Les Vampires In November 1915, the walls of Paris were plastered with street posters that depicted three masked faces with a question mark as a noose, and the questions "who, what, when, where?"

The morning newspapers printed the following poem:

Of the moonless…

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Added by Tome Wilson on November 27, 2010 at 5:00pm — No Comments

Libertador

The time is the late 30's, the place is somewhere in South America... yes, some sort of Latino-style Diesel City.

Added by Stefan on November 27, 2010 at 11:02am — 2 Comments

Knights of the Air: Alexander Kozakov

Alexander Alexandrovich Kozakov* (1889-1919) was Russia's highest scoring ace of the Great War, with 20 victories.

He was born in Kherson province. Educated in Cadet Corps and Cavalry Officers School, he entered the ranks in 1908, beginning his service with Belgorod Uhlans. Ironically, the Colonel-in-Chief of his regiment was no other than Franz Josef of Austria and Hungary. After serving in the light… Continue

Added by lord_k on November 27, 2010 at 6:30am — 2 Comments

Minneapolis Modernism

This comes too late, but there was an excellent Modernism exhibition at the Minneapolis Institute of Art. So much delicious chrome and glass.

Added by White City Rippers on November 26, 2010 at 10:27am — 1 Comment

Lord K's Garage - #65. Horch 850 Series

Of all pre-war German cars, Maybach was the most powerful, Mercedes-Benz the most impressive and Horch the most elegant.

Horch & Cie. Motorwagenwerke AG was founded by August Horch in 1904. Six years later Horch, who had to leave his first company after a financial conflict, founded another car company,… Continue

Added by lord_k on November 26, 2010 at 6:30am — No Comments

Happy Thanksgiving!

A thanksgiving turkey is delivered to Washington, D.C., for President Herbert Hoover.

Tuesday, Nov. 26, 1929.

From the National Photo Company collection



Via Shorpy

View full image



---------------------------

Of the… Continue

Added by lord_k on November 25, 2010 at 6:30am — 2 Comments

Texas Museum of Automotive History

Yesterday, 11/24/10, my wife and I visited the new Texas Museum of Automotive History located in the historic Dallas Fair Park grounds. They have an amazing collection of classic cars and the staff were fantastic. They showed a true love of cars and treated us as welcomed guests. It was a fantastic experiance and if you ever come this way you need to visit this museum. The web site is http://www.tmah.org/…









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Added by Larry on November 24, 2010 at 2:41pm — 3 Comments

Pedersen's Rifle

As the clouds of war parted, firearms designer John Pedersen looked to the future of small arms, anticipating the need for a new semi-automatic rifle to replace the M1913 Springfield. Pedersen would put together a rifle, unusual for its method of operation, that would go up against the weapon fielded by the U.S. during World War II.



And yet, in the years before the war, the Japanese… Continue

Added by Jake Holman Jr. on November 24, 2010 at 2:00pm — 1 Comment

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