Dieselpunks

Dieselpunk + Steampunk Culture

May 2011 Articles (72)

The Great Collapse (1) - HG Wells' War in the Air

Chapter 11: The Great Collapse

"And now the whole fabric of civilisation was bending and giving, and dropping to pieces and melting in the furnace of the war."

 HG Wells' War in the Air


Buy HG Wells' War in the Air from the Dieselpunks Shop > http://astore.amazon.com/dieselpunks-20/detail/0141441305

Download a free eBook version of HG Wells' War in the Air > …

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Added by Tome Wilson on May 22, 2011 at 3:00pm — 2 Comments

New Art by Stefan

Though Lord_K has already mentioned this elsewhere, I'm proud to announce that Stefan has been so gracious as to create a new logo for my group that I'm working to establish, "North Texas Dieselpunks." He created a color version for the web site and a black & white version that will be useful for printing on handouts or flyers.

 

I can't say how much I appreciate Stefan's work on this. He's such an amazing artist and such a great guy. We are so lucky to have Stefan as a…

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Added by Larry on May 22, 2011 at 2:30pm — 1 Comment

Sunday Streamline #33: The Balkan Spirit

This dream machine is perfectly fit for any kind of Dieselpunk movie:

It was built for scheduled express service between Belgrade and Zagreb. The picture above is widely known but information on the streamline loco is scarce. A thorough search brought me to a number of Serbia- and Croatia-based forums, one of them providing useful info and additional images.…

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Added by lord_k on May 22, 2011 at 6:30am — No Comments

Dieselpunk & the Media

There have been some interesting appearance of references to Dieselpunk in the media. Not long ago Doug Bell of the band Bellevue Cadillac referred to their band as as "dieselpunk band" during an newspaper interview.

 …

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Added by Larry on May 21, 2011 at 3:08pm — 7 Comments

How War Came to New York (4) - HG Wells' War in the Air

Chapter 6: How War Came to New York

"Much of this artillery was still unmounted, and nearly all of it was unprotected when the German air-fleet reached New York. And down in the crowded streets, when that occurred, the readers of the New York papers were regaling themselves with wonderful and wonderfully illustrated accounts of such matters as:--

THE SECRET OF THE THUNDERBOLT

AGED SCIENTIST PERFECTS ELECTRIC GUN

TO ELECTROCUTE AIRSHIP CREWS BY UPWARD…

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Added by Tome Wilson on May 21, 2011 at 3:00pm — No Comments

S.A.M.#1: U.S. Air Mail, 1918

There's no need to retell the story of "Inverted Jenny":

The stamp is the most famous error in American philately. The biplane is Curtiss JN-4 Jenny, also famous. But do you know that the first air mail bags were flown to the wrong direction? Yes, Army Lt. George L. Boyle who was selected to pilot aircraft #38262 on the first Northbound flight (from…

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Added by lord_k on May 21, 2011 at 6:30am — 2 Comments

How War Came to New York (3) - HG Wells' War in the Air

Chapter 6: How War Came to New York

"For many generations New York had taken no heed of war, save as a thing that happened far away, that affected prices and supplied the newspapers with exciting headlines and pictures. The New Yorkers felt perhaps even more certainly than the English had done that war in their own land was an impossible thing. In that they shared the delusion of all North America. They felt as secure as spectators at a bullfight; they risked their money…

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Added by Tome Wilson on May 20, 2011 at 3:00pm — No Comments

Lord K's Garage - #89. Opel Rocket Cars & Craft

Remember Fritz von Opel? The one with a rocket motorcycle?

The motorcycle is only half of the story... no, less than half. Here's the story of other Opel rocket vehicles brought to us by David Traver Adolphus @ Hemmings…

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Added by lord_k on May 20, 2011 at 6:30am — 1 Comment

How War Came to New York (2) - HG Wells' War in the Air

Chapter 6: How War Came to New York

"It was the peculiar shape of Manhattan Island, pressed in by arms of the sea on either side, and incapable of comfortable expansion, except along a narrow northward belt, that first gave the New York architects their bias for extreme vertical dimensions. Every need was lavishly supplied them--money, material, labour; only space was restricted. To begin, therefore, they built high perforce. But to do so was to discover a whole new world of…

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Added by Tome Wilson on May 19, 2011 at 3:00pm — 3 Comments

Soviet Book Design, 1920s

Content is nothing. Looks are everything. We've seen great works of art created to advertise cheap soap or mediocre movies.

With books, looks are often inferior to content, but sometimes the opposite is true. Even a statistics handbook can become a work of art, provided with appropriate cover. That's what Lyubov Popova has done for the Russian Postage & Telegraph Statistics, 1921 (above):…

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Added by lord_k on May 19, 2011 at 6:30am — No Comments

How War Came to New York (1) - HG Wells' War in the Air

Chapter 6: How War Came to New York

"The City of New York was in the year of the German attack the largest, richest, in many respects the most splendid, and in some, the wickedest city the world had ever seen. She was the supreme type of the City of the Scientific Commercial Age; she displayed its greatness, its power, its ruthless anarchic enterprise, and its social disorganisation most strikingly and completely. She had long ousted London from her pride of place as the modern…

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Added by Tome Wilson on May 18, 2011 at 3:00pm — No Comments

Improvised Defense: UK Arms Ingenuity Pt.1

It's said that adversity and austerity are muses of invention; or as U.S. Marines say, Improvise - Adapt - Overcome.

As the British people faced the specter of imminent invasion from the forces of the Third Reich every manner of weapon, old and new was pressed into service.

And when weapons could not be ramped up, they were improvised. One such example of…

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Added by Jake Holman Jr. on May 18, 2011 at 2:00pm — No Comments

Elegant Modernism: Robert Mallet-Stevens

Generally, I'm not a big fan of Modernism. But I can easily like it when it's not too declarative, brutal or vulgar. Hope you like this kind of Modernism too.

Robert (Rob) Mallet-Stevens (1886 - 1945) was a French architect and designer. Today he is regarded as one the most influential figures in French architecture in the period between the two World Wars.

He was born in Paris in a house called Maison-Laffitte (designed by Francois Mansart in…

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Added by lord_k on May 18, 2011 at 6:30am — 3 Comments

The Battle of the North Atlantic (2) - HG Wells' War in the Air

Chapter 5: The Battle of the North Atlantic

"The incident that gave him his third shock was the execution of one of the men on the Adler for carrying a box of matches. The case was a flagrant one. The man had forgotten he had it upon him when coming aboard. Ample notice had been given to every one of the gravity of this offence, and notices appeared at numerous points all over the airships. The man's defence was that he had grown so used to the notices and had been so…

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Added by Tome Wilson on May 17, 2011 at 3:00pm — No Comments

Two Fisted Tuesdays with Philip Marlowe - The Final Payment

Welcome to Two Fisted Tuesdays, Dieselpunks' weekly beat on the mean streets.

Starring Gerald Mohr and starting with the famous lines, "Get this and get it straight! Crime is a sucker's road and those who travel it wind up in the gutter, the prison or the grave." The Adventures of Philip Marlowe runs about 25 minutes without commercials. You can listen to this blast from the past in MP3 format for free at the link below.…

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Added by Tome Wilson on May 17, 2011 at 12:00pm — No Comments

Curtiss SOC Seagull, a WWII Biplane

WWII was a monoplanes' war... Was it really?

OK, I'm repeating myself. But the biplane in question wasn't mentioned in that old article / album. And it served until the end of the war - as a scout and trainer, floatplane and deck plane, - modest, elegant and reliable.

The SOC was designed mainly as a catapult-launched floatplane, flying from battleships for gunfire…

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Added by lord_k on May 17, 2011 at 6:00am — No Comments

The Battle of the North Atlantic (1) - HG Wells' War in the Air

Chapter 5: The Battle of the North Atlantic

"Bert was in his cabin, and chanced to see the dew vanish from the window and caught the gleam of sunlight outside. He looked out, and saw once more that sunlit cloud floor he had seen first from the balloon, and the ships of the German air-fleet rising one by one from the white, as fish might rise an become visible from deep water. He stared for a moment and then ran out to the little gallery to see this wonder better. Below was…

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Added by Tome Wilson on May 16, 2011 at 3:00pm — No Comments

War and Peace of W. Heath Robinson

It's good to start a week with some pulp. But sometimes a classic cartoon is even better start.

I believe the artist whose name is associated with some weirdest inventions and technologies deserves a place in our Hall of Fame. Here's his biography told by…

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Added by lord_k on May 16, 2011 at 6:30am — 1 Comment

Miskatonic Monday - Lovecraft is dead

HP Lovecraft obituary

Added by Tome Wilson on May 16, 2011 at 12:00am — No Comments

Tome Wilson and "The Lost Generation"

It's surprised me that no one has mentioned the recent article by our very own Tome Wilson in Issue 18 of The Gatehouse Gazette titled, "The Lost Generation." He does a wonderful job of capturing the essence of the 1920s with all of it's challenges and promise. I highly recommend it.

 

Good job, Tome!…

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Added by Larry on May 15, 2011 at 7:41pm — 4 Comments

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