Dieselpunks

Dieselpunk + Steampunk Culture

This futuristic concept, drawn by Jo Gault in 1946, could be a Buick:

Concept For Buick

Real postwar Buicks, no less impressive with their beautiful curves, massive fenders and extensive chrome trim, were developed from 1942 models:

1942 Buick(via Paul Malon, on Flickr)

The 1942 model year began in September 1941. Despite the hardships imposed by lack of materials and uncertain production schedules, Buick made substantial changes in its 1942 models, and the near total redesign caught virtually all other auto makers by surprise. The new Buick was an extremely modern car, with its massive chrome grill and large bumpers.

1942 Buick Super Sedanet & 4-Door Sedan1942 Buick Super Sedanet & 4-Door Sedan by aldenjewell, on Flickr

After 1 January 1942, the government prohibited the use of all chrome trim, and thus all trim pieces were painted in matching colors, primarily battleship gray. Known as 'blackout models,' production of these chrome-less cars stopped on 2 February 1942 when the government ended all auto production for the duration of the war. However, Buick did not have to resort to painted bumpers because it had enough pre-restriction chromed bumpers on hand to complete its 1942 model run.

1942 Buick Extra Special Estate Wagon1942 Buick Extra Special Estate Wagon by aldenjewell, on Flickr

The last Buick to leave the factory carried a sign reading: 'Until total victory we dedicate ourselves to the objective 'When better war goods are built, Buick workmen will build them.''

After the war, the passenger car production resumed. For 1946 model year, Buick introduced slightly revised versions of their Special, Super, and Roadmaster.

1946 Buick Super Eight 4-Door Sedan (4 of 9)1946 Buick Super Eight 4-Door Sedan by myoldpostcards, on Flickr

1946 Buick Sedan

A middle-aged man in a suit standing next to his Buick. It's a 1946 or 47 model, possibly a Roadmaster. The car is sitting in the drive of a upper-middle class suburban home (by Raymondx1, on Flickr)

1947 Buick Roadmaster Model 71 Four-Door Sedan

1947 Buick Roadmaster Model 71 Four-Door Sedan by aldenjewell, on Flickr

1947 Buick Convertible

1947 Buick Convertible by aldenjewell, on Flickr

1947 Flxible Buick Ambulance

1947 Flxible Buick Ambulance by aldenjewell, on Flickr

1948 was the (model) year of the famous Dynaflow transmission - initially available only in the Roadmaster.

1948 Buick Special 4d sdn - green - fvl  1948 Buick Special 4-Dood Sedan by Rex Gray, on Flickr

1948 Buick Special 4d sdn - green - rvr

1948 Buick Super Sedanette - TT green - fvl

1948 Buick Super Sedanette by Rex Gray, on Flickr

1948 Buick Super Sedanette - TT green - rvl

1948 Buick Super 4d sdn - TT green - fvr

1948 Buick Super Sedan by Rex Gray, on Flickr

1948 Buick Super 4d sdn - TT green - svr

1948 Buick Super woody - fvr

1948 Buick Super Estate Wagon by Rex Gray, on Flickr

1948 Buick Super woody - rvr

1948 Buick Roadmaster Convertible - yellow - fvl

1948 Buick Roadmaster Convertible by Rex Gray, on Flickr

1948 Buick Roadmaster Convertible - yellow - rvr

Dusty Excuses

1949 Buick ad by paul.malon, on Flickr

in 1949, the Riviera name first entered the Buick line  as the designation for the new two-door pillarless hardtop, which was described in advertising as "stunningly smart."

1949 Buick Roadmaster 'THE49ER' 10

1949 Buick Roadmaster Riviera 'THE49ER' by Jack_Snell, on Flickr

1949 Buick Roadmaster 'THE49ER' 06

1949 Buick Roadmaster 'THE49ER' 02

1949 Buick Riviera

1949 Buick Riviera by aldenjewell, on Flickr

1949 Buick Roadmaster Estate Wagon

1949 Buick Roadmaster Estate Wagon by aldenjewell, on Flickr

1949 Buick Eight Convertible 1

1949 Buick Eight Convertible by Jack_Snell, on Flickr

1949 Buick Roadmaster Convertible

1949 Buick Roadmaster Convertible by aldenjewell, on Flickr

And this 1949 Buick Roadmaster Convertible from the 1988 film Rain Man featuring Tom Cruise and Dustin Hoffman was recently seen at an auction here.

The straight-eight powered convertible is one of two used in filming and features an upgraded rear suspension to cope with the weight of a cameraman and camera equipment.

See you next Friday!

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Comment by Pilsner Panther on December 3, 2012 at 3:17am

Y-job, that's right. I got the name wrong, but I agree with Larry. It should have been called "The Black Raven Eight," or something like that. The prosaic name was probably stuck on this beauty because it was never meant for mass-production. However, its lineage in the Buick line and on GM products from the other divisions is unmistakable.

Comment by Larry on December 2, 2012 at 8:34am

The Y-Job is a beautiful car but name sounds just plain wrong. ;)

Comment by lord_k on December 2, 2012 at 1:23am

To Pilsner Panther:

Y-Car, you say? Y-job! And we've got a special article featuring this one and only car!

Comment by Pilsner Panther on December 2, 2012 at 12:18am

You should have included a photo of the Buick Y-Car, since these designs were all derived from it. Gorgeous automobiles, but I wish they'd kept the hide-away headlights!

Comment by Larry on November 30, 2012 at 6:56pm

Pure works of art. Love them.

Comment by lord_k on November 30, 2012 at 5:10pm

My pleasure, Dan.

Comment by Dan G. on November 30, 2012 at 12:54pm

Love them old Buicks! 

Aaaaa for the days when Gas was CHEAP!!!  LOL

Thanks, Lord K!

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